Primary Health Care Learning Series

Join us to learn about research and quality assurance projects being conducted by the primary and integrated health care community

Date: August 18, 2021 | 12:00 – 1:15 pm ADT

This event is free and open to everyone. You must register in advance: https://bit.ly/3fwVHd1

Information about joining the Zoom webinar will be sent after registration.

Primary Health Care Access, Attachment & Innovations in Nova Scotia Before & During the Pandemic

About the speakers:

Emily Gard Marshall

Dr. Emily Gard Marshall is an Associate Professor in the Dalhousie Department of Family Medicine Primary Care Research Unit. Her mixed methods research examines primary healthcare from patient, provider, and system perspectives to address the quadruple aim. Foci include access, continuity, and comprehensiveness to improve equity and optimize outcomes across the life course, involving population data and vulnerable populations. She was the 2020 recipient of the NAPCRG Mid-Career Researcher Award, and leads multiple pan-Canadian research studies including the CIHR COVID-19 Rapid Response-funded PUPPY-Study.

Mackenzie Cook

Mackenzie Cook is a medical student completing her Research in Medicine (RIM) project in the Department of Family Medicine at Dalhousie University. With the support of Dr. Emily Gard Marshall and her research team, Mackenzie is examining the perspectives of Nova Scotian primary care providers and policymakers on the use of incentives for providers to take on unattached patients from a centralized waiting list. She is eager to share the perspectives of stakeholders and use the knowledge they share to help improve primary health care. 

Helping Parents with Anxiety and Depression Symptoms During COVID-19: An iCBT Longitudinal Study

About the Speaker:

Teba Hamodat is a second year Clinical Psychology PhD student at Dalhousie University researching refugee parents with neurodevelopmental disorders’ access to healthcare. She is passionate about equitable access to health services for individuals who need it. She currently is completing a comprehensive project with Co-Principal Investigator Dr. Alissa Pencer on a project assessing depression and anxiety symptom change for parents using Tranquility Online, an online CBT platform during COVID-19. Parents can go through the program completely self-directed or with minimal or full coaching. The research team is interested in examining the differential impact of guidance level on parents’ symptomology.

The overall project is funded by CIHR and the NB Health Research Foundation.

Team members: Co-PIs: Dr. Janine Olthuis (UNB) & Dr. Alissa Pencer (Dalhousie University & Tranquility)
Principal Knowledge User: Dr. Lori Wozney (NSHA)
Co-Investigators: Dr. Amanda Hudson (Health PEI), Dr. Sam Stewart (Dalhousie University), & Dr. Jennifer Richards (IWK)

Primary Health Care Learning Series

Join us to learn about research and quality assurance projects being conducted by the primary and integrated health care community

Date: June 16, from 12:30 – 1:45 pm ADT

This event is free and open to everyone. You must register in advance: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8MmH5K6LQGOcWTXwSsRx8Q
Information about joining the Zoom webinar will be sent after registration.

Topic: Innovative navigation programs to help individuals and families affected by life-limiting chronic illnesses navigate end-of-life: a realist evaluation

About the presenters:

Dr. Robin Urquhart is an Associate Professor and the Canadian Cancer Society (Nova Scotia Division) Endowed Chair in Population Cancer Research in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at Dalhousie University. She is also a Senior Scientist with the Beatrice Hunter Cancer Research Institute and an Affiliate Scientist at Nova Scotia Health. Her research interests include access to and quality of care, improving patient and family outcomes and experiences, and how we can more effectively move research evidence into clinical practice and healthcare policy.

Cynthia Kendall is a Project Coordinator at the Cancer Outcomes Research Program in the Department of Surgery at Nova Scotia Health. In this role, she supports research in a number of areas, including: cancer care, frailty, end-of-life care, and implementation science. Cynthia is also a PhD Candidate in the Interdisciplinary PhD Program at Dalhousie University. Her thesis research is focused on examining the factors affecting access to administrative health data for research in Canada.

Primary Health Care Learning Series

Join us to learn about research and quality assurance projects being conducted by the primary and integrated health care community

Date: April 21, 2021 from 12:30 – 1:45 pm ADT

This event is free and open to everyone. You must register in advance: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_qXdaTM-eTxqg-xh4JjlW7Q  
Information about joining the Zoom webinar will be sent after registration.

This webinar will consist of two presentations:

  • Maureen Coady will present: Informal professional learning in a community-based health education program: The transformative learning of one interprofessional team
  • Nicole MacKenzie: Shared Decision Making: A Missing Link in Pediatric Pain Management?

About the presenters:

Dr. Maureen Coady is an Associate Professor in the Department of Adult Education at StFX. Her research focuses on the links between health and learning, and the role adult education can play in enabling learning, agency and improved health outcomes in the population. She co-ordinates an M. Ed. in Adult Education & Health at StFX and is particularly interested in empowering ways of working with people, which is the focus of this presentation: Informal Professional Learning in a Community-Based Health Education Program: The transformative Experience of One Interprofessional Team* Her most recent work focuses on continuing professional education (CPE), particularly as it relates to health contexts, but more broadly for all those engaged in professional occupations.

*Coady, M. (2019). Informal professional learning in a community-based health education program: The transformative learning of one interprofessional team. In T. Carter, C. Boden-McGill & K. Pino (Eds.), Transformative learning, resilience, and professional identity formation, (pp.321-342). Information Age Publishing (IAP).

Nicole MacKenzie is a third year PhD student in Clinical Psychology at Dalhousie University, where she is supervised by Dr. Christine Chambers. She completed her BA in Early Childhood Studies at Ryerson University and an MEd in Developmental Psychology at the University of Toronto. Stemming from her research and volunteer experiences in pediatric health settings, her research interests within pediatric pain include interventions for procedure pain management and how shared decision making and knowledge mobilization can improve families’ and healthcare providers use of evidence-based practices. Her current research is focused on understanding how diverse stakeholders engage with knowledge mobilization to promote uptake of evidence-based strategies to better manage children’s pain. Nicole is supported by awards from the Maritime SPOR Support Unit, Research Nova Scotia, Killam Trusts, and is a past recipient of a BRIC NS Student Award.

Primary Health Care Learning Series

Join us to learn about research and quality assurance projects being conducted by the primary and integrated health care community

Date: Feb. 17, 2021 from 12:30 – 1:45 pm AST

This event is free and open to everyone. You must register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_BRQKAWxkSw68neRWre4pMw Information about joining the Zoom webinar will be sent after registration.

This webinar will consist of two presentations:

  • Mathew Grandy will present: Utilizing EMR Data for primary care research: Insights and challenges in making data accessible for research and QI at a practice level
  • Virginia McIntyre and Karly Stefko will present: A promising intervention: the successful implementation of a 10-week exercise program for individuals with chronic pain

About the presenters:

Dr. Mathew Grandy’s research interests lie in utilizing EMR data to better understand chronic disease, medication prescribing and complex patients in the primary care setting.  As network director for the Maritime Research Network of Family Practice (MaRNet-FP), he has the opportunity to work with and involve an enthusiastic network of community-based physicians for research projects and quality improvement. MaRNet-FP is the Nova Scotia network involved in a larger cross country research project which utilizes EMR data for chronic disease surveillance. This study, named the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), has been ongoing in Nova Scotia since 2009.  Currently, Dr. Grandy is involved in a number of projects. He is leading a study on identifying and describing chronic opioid prescribing utilizing EMR data, as well as collaborative projects such as; identifying frailty utilizing machine learning and combining EMR data on polypharmacy in the elderly with training on quality improvement within the practice setting.

Virginia McIntyre is on the board of the People In Pain Network (PIPN) and the Maritimes PIPN Director. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, a Diploma in Radiological as well as in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and has completed professional development courses in Communications and Leadership development. She uses her educational background and lived experience to lead pain related initiatives and participate as a lived experience advisor on, research teams and on conference and the Atlantic Mentorship Network: Pain and Addictions advisory committee. She has extensive experience locally and nationally advocating for those living with pain to have access to the tools they need to live well.

Karly Stefko is a recent graduate of Acadia University with a Bachelor of Kinesiology with Honours and is certified with the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology as a Clinical Exercise Physiologist (CSEP-CEP). She currently works as a Kinesiologist with Acadia University where she is responsible for leading community exercise programs around Kings County. Karly also operates her own business where she provides one-on-one in-home and virtual exercise training to those 50+ and is involved as a CEP with iTreatment, a virtual platform that promotes a holistic approach to addiction recovery. Karly primarily works with older adults, both healthy and those with chronic conditions, such as Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, Chronic Pain, and Arthritis.

Primary Health Care Learning Series

Join us to learn about research and quality assurance projects being conducted by the primary and integrated health care community

Date: Dec. 10, 2020 from 12:30 – 1:45 pm AST

This event is free and open to everyone. You must register in advance: https://bit.ly/3nbbwYp

Information about joining the Zoom webinar will be sent after registration.

This webinar will consist of two presentations:

Presentation 1 – Invisible Women: Carceral facilities for women and girls across Canada and proximity to maternal health care

Presentation 2 – Reproductive health outcomes among incarcerated women in Canada: A scoping review

About the presenters:

Clare Heggie is a recent graduate of the MA Health Promotion program at Dalhousie University, where her research focused on the experience of survivors of sexualized violence in rural NS. She is currently a school health promoter at the Chignecto-Central Regional Centre for Education, and continues to engage in health research as a research assistant at the Dalhousie School of Nursing and on the Atlantic COAST Study.

Martha Paynter, RN, is a registered nurse practicing in abortion and postpartum care in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is a PhD Candidate in Nursing at Dalhousie University where her research is situated at the intersection of criminalization and reproductive health. Martha’s doctoral research is supported by the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, CIHR Banting-Best Canadian Doctoral Scholarship, the Killam Predoctoral Scholarship, the Canadian Nurses Foundation, Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre.
In 2012, she founded Wellness Within, a non-profit organization for health and justice for people experiencing criminalization. WW provides doula support to people experiencing incarceration and education to health professionals and the public about criminalization as a structural determinant of health. WW is a national leader in advocacy for prison abolition, reproductive justice and health equity.

Primary Health Care Learning Series

Join us to learn about research and quality assurance projects being conducted by the primary and integrated health care community

Date: Oct. 21, 2020 from 12:30 – 1:45 pm ADT

This event is free and open to everyone. You must register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7TgyosfnSV2D8y5sC9Ms-Q

Information about joining the Zoom webinar will be sent after registration.

This webinar will consist of two presentations:

Dr. George Kephart will present “Measuring the Complexity Case-Mix of Patient Needs to Inform the Design and Deployment of Collaborative Family Practice Teams”

Dr. George Kephart is a Professor in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology and the School of Health Administration at Dalhousie University. His research interests include health policy evaluation, equity and access to health services, chronic disease surveillance, and chronic disease management. His current research projects focus on the development of new patient reported measures of chronic disease self-management that can be used for clinical assessment and research, and using small area rate variation methods to measure differences in primary health care system performance between communities. He will be presenting some of the results from a rapid review of primary health care teams in Nova Scotia, with a focus on understanding how the attributes of collaborative family practice teams align with the needs of their patients.

Dr. Ruth Martin-Misener will present “Facilitators and Barriers to Addressing Patient Care Priorities in Collaborative Care Models in Nova Scotia:  Focus Group and Interview Findings from a Rapid Review

Dr. Ruth Martin-Misener is a Professor and the Director of the School of Nursing and Assistant Dean, Research, Faculty of Health at Dalhousie University. She is an Affiliate Scientist with Nova Scotia Health and the Maritime SPOR Support Unit and Co-Director of the Canadian Centre for Advanced Practice Nursing Research at McMaster University. The focus of her research is evaluation of the implementation and outcomes of the nurse practitioner role and innovative interprofessional team-based models in primary and long-term care.