FAQs


What is SPOR?
What are the different elements of SPOR?
What is patient-oriented research?
How do I apply for projects?

 

What is SPOR?
The Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research is an initiative of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. It is about ensuring that the right patient receives the right intervention at the right time. Partners at federal and provincial levels have joined together to support SPOR, and represent a variety of roles including patients, researchers, policy-makers, practitioners and others.

SPOR will foster evidence-informed healthcare to improve quality, accountability, and accessibility of care. More information about SPOR can be found here.

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What are the different elements of SPOR?

SPOR is a strategic initiative of CIHR. There are multiple components:

Networks

SUPPORT Units are located across the country to support knowledge translation, provide data and methodological expertise, and support other activities that allow for patient-oriented research.

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What is patient-oriented research?

Patient-oriented research is focused on priorities that are important to patients and produces information that can be used to improve healthcare practice, treatments and policies. Ultimately, patient-oriented research is aimed at achieving benefits that matter to patients including:

  • Improved health
  • Improved access to the healthcare system
  • The right treatment at the right time
  • Being an active and informed partner in healthcare
  • Quality of life that is tied to patient-oriented outcomes
  • Improving cost-effectiveness of the healthcare system

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How do I apply for projects?

You must be a BRIC NS member.  To join BRIC NS, fill out the form on our Join BRIC NS page.  Members are able to apply for funding that has been earmarked by CIHR for primary and integrated healthcare research.  Members interested in leading a project must contact the network to discuss requirements. All projects must involve at least one other provincial network and require matching funding from non-federal sources.

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