BRIC NS Student Seminar Series – November 2020

The BRIC NS Student Seminar Series is an opportunity for students to present their completed or in-progress research. Presenters cover a wide range of topics and disciplines, with the common thread of primary and integrated health care research running throughout. Everyone is welcome! For more information, contact: bricns@dal.ca

This month’s seminar is Why Family Medicine? , investigating the reasons why medical students pursue a career in Family Medicine. Second-year Dalhousie University medical student Bright Huo will present this research on behalf of the research team.

When: Wednesday, November 18th, 2020 12:30-1:45pm AST
Where: N/A – This session will take place remotely only
Register in advance: https://bit.ly/3eTCtwH

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

About the researchers:

Bright Huo is a second-year medical student at Dalhousie University and acts as the Vice-President of Medical Education for the Dalhousie Medical Student Society. As such, he is involved in various local and national meetings and working groups surrounding medical education. He is also a student representative on the Board of Directors of Doctors Nova Scotia and on Council for the College of Physicians & Surgeons of Nova Scotia. His research interests include the intersection between primary care and surgery as well as medical education.

Wyatt MacNevin is currently a 3rd year medical student at Dalhousie Medical School. Prior to medical school, Wyatt received his BScE in Design Engineering at the University of Prince Edward Island where he had research interests in biomedical engineering and process improvement. His current research interests include medical student career planning and medical education.

BRIC NS Student Seminar Series – September 2020

The recorded session is available here: https://bricns.com/resources/.

The BRIC NS Student Seminar Series is an opportunity for students to present their completed or in-progress research. Presenters cover a wide range of topics and disciplines, with the common thread of primary and integrated health care research running throughout. Everyone is welcome! For more information, contact: bricns@dal.ca

This month’s seminar features speakers from the Grant Lab at Mount Saint Vincent University and is a special presentation on Chronic Disease Prevention and Treatment in Pregnant Women: Examples of Dietetic Research at the IWK.

When: Wednesday, September 16th, 2020 12:30-1:45pm ADT
Where: N/A – This session will take place remotely only
Register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HCW-FIW-QUacKvpLRNSpNg

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


The seminar will cover two topics:

Julianne Leblanc will present “The Effect of a Home-Based Glycaemic Index Education intervention on Dietary Glycaemic Index and Glycaemic Control in Nova Scotian Women living with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Intervention Evaluation from the Patients’ Perspective”


Amy Mireault 
will present “Examining the Implementation of the Institute of Medicine Weight Gain Guidelines in Women Living with Obesity”

About the Speakers:

Julianne Leblanc is a second year MSc candidate at Mount Saint Vincent University in the Applied Human Nutrition department. She is a French Canadian with a background working on the floor as a dietetic technician and administrative work in Health Records. She developed a keen interest in the area of perinatal care and diabetes from her work in the Grant lab with her supervisor, Dr. Shannan Grant. Her thesis research is with the Maternal Newborn Program at the IWK Health Centre. She is using integrative knowledge translation in home-based education to evaluate Glycaemic Index utility in Gestational Diabetes. This work is part of a continuum to larger initiative integrated knowledge translation strategy aimed at improving and increasing Glycaemic Index utility in Medical Nutrition Therapy among clinicians across Canada. Julianne will begin her dietetic internship when this project nears completion and she aspires to become a dietitian and work with the dynamic clinical dietetic research in healthcare.

Amy Mireault received her BAS in Psychology and Nutrition from the University of Guelph in Ontario and her BScAHN in Dietetics from Mount Saint Vincent University, completing the IEP program. She is a current second year MSc Student at MSVU, Dietetic Candidate and research assistant through MSVU and Dalhousie University. She is also a trainee member of Translating evidence to enhance maternal newborn outcomes – obesity; a CIHR funded community of practice based at IWK. Her general research interests include health psychology, chronic disease care including obesity, women health and knowledge synthesis. Amy’s future aspirations include continuing in research and contributing to the improvement of current care practices and advocating for more person-centered care.

Meet the winners of the 2020 BRIC NS Student Research Award

BRIC NS is pleased to announce the winners of its annual Student Research Award.  The award provides financial support to graduate students undertaking a health-related research project that addresses BRIC NS priorities.  Winning applications demonstrate their relevance to, and potential impact on, primary health care.  Reviewers also assess patient engagement and knowledge translation plans, feasibility, and overall quality.

This year’s recipients will be recognized at a virtual awards ceremony. Winners will present during the 2020-21 Student Seminar Series.

Student Research Award winners for 2020 are:

 

Cassidy Bradley (Master of Science, Epidemiology and Applied Health Research)

Evaluation of the Association Between Social Well Being and Physical Function in a Population Based Sample of Prostate Cancer Survivors

Emma Stirling Cameron (Master of Arts, Health Promotion)

Understanding Access to Postnatal Healthcare for Syrian Refugee Women in Nova Scotia: Barriers, Facilitators, and a Need for Services

Justine Dol (PhD, Health)

Essential Coaching for Every Mother during COVID-19: A remote text message based postnatal education program for first time mothers

Julia Kontak (PhD, Health)

Opportunities with a capital ‘O’: Understanding the impact of the school environment on children’s health behaviours

Note: Funding deferred until September 2021

Anders Lenskjold (Master of Health Informatics)

Tracing the Patterns of Potentially Inappropriate Clinical Actions in Primary Care

The BRIC NS Student Research Award is just one of the ways that BRIC NS is working to build capacity in primary and integrated health care research.  Other capacity building activities include:

  • Yearly financial support for one graduate student to participate in TUTOR-PHC, a one-year certificate program in primary health care research skills and interdisciplinary theory and processes.
  • The BRIC NS Student Seminar Series, an opportunity for students to present their completed or in-progress research. These popular seminars are attended by researchers, members of the public, decision-makers and others.  Presenters cover a wide range of topics and disciplines, with the common thread of primary and integrated health care research running throughout.
  • Encouraging learners to attend our Project Incubators, an opportunity to create new, collaborative research teams with the goal of creating a research question related to BRIC NS priorities and applying for research funding. 
  • Connecting learners with other BRIC NS members working in their area of interest.

Thank you to all who applied and congratulations to our winners!

Congratulations to Ryley Urban, winner of the 2019 BRIC NS Student Poster Award

PHCRD 2019 - Student Poster Award final
Beverley Lawson, Director of BRIC NS, presents the 2019 Student Poster Award to Ryley Urban.

Congratulations to Ryley Urban, currently pursuing her Master’s in Industrial Engineering at Dalhousie University!  Ryley is the winner of the third annual BRIC NS Student Poster Award for her poster “Panel reallocation model for providers in Rural Nova Scotia.”  The prize is presented at Primary Health Care Research Day.

Eighteen posters were up for consideration, presented by undergraduate, Master’s and PhD students, representing three universities.  Thank you to all of our applicants and judges.

BRIC NS is pleased to offer an award for best student poster given at Primary Health Care Research Day. To be eligible, the abstract must be accepted by the Primary Health Care Research Day Program Committee. Applicants must be currently enrolled in a degree program at a Nova Scotia university or community college.  Applicants must be first author on posters and must present their own work and not that of an advisor.  Reviewers assess the overall quality of the poster’s content and the presenter’s ability to successfully and succinctly present the subject matter.

LEARN Series: Reducing Employee Stress using the RIGHT Way of Leadership

Please join us on April 17th for a co-presented lecture with the Industrial and Organizational Psychology program at Saint Mary’s University.  BRIC NS Student Research Award recipient Duygu Biricik Gulseren will present her research on leadership and employee stress.  Attendees will also have an opportunity to learn about BRIC NS.

LEARN-Duygu Biricik Gulseren April 17 2019

Details:

Reducing Employee Stress using the RIGHT Way of Leadership
Duygu Biricik Gulseren
Wednesday, April 17th | 2:00 – 3:15 pm
4th Floor, Sobey School of Business

All welcome, please RSVP to cncohs@smu.ca 

BRIC NS Student Seminar Series

The BRIC NS Student Seminar Series is an opportunity for students to present their completed or in-progress research.  Presenters cover a wide range of topics and disciplines, with the common thread of primary and integrated health care research running throughout.  Everyone is welcome!

When: April 3, 2019 from 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Where: Room 315, Collaborative Health Education Building, 5793 University Ave., Halifax

For remote attendance options please email bricns@dal.ca.

Logan Lawrence will present “Developing a tool for assessing policy capacity: A case study of nurse practitioners in primary care in Nova Scotia.”

Rachel Ollivier will present “Exploring Postpartum Sexual Health in Nova Scotia Using Feminist Poststructuralism.”

About the speakers

Logan Lawrence is a PhD candidate in Dalhousie’s PhD Health program. His doctoral research involves testing and adapting a framework for studying policy capacity in Nova Scotia’s health system. He has received financial support for his studies from the Killam Trust, Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Maritime SPOR Support Unit, and Nova Scotia Graduate Scholarship. He also currently holds a Health Systems Impact Fellowship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, which enables him to work with the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness and learn the craft of health policy-making. Logan’s enjoyment of understanding different facets of ideas extends outside of academia: reading and writing, cooking and eating, playing and listening to music, being active and making quiet. He holds a Master of Science in Kinesiology from Dalhousie, and originally hails from Alberta.

Rachel Ollivier is a first-year PhD in Nursing student at Dalhousie University. She completed her BScN degree in 2016 at UBC Okanagan and has clinical experience in acute medicine and surgery, with a current position as a Registered Nurse on the Adult Surgical Unit (Women’s Health) at the IWK Health Centre. Rachel’s areas of research interest include global health, women’s health, and maternal health. She has previously completed nursing and research placements in Zambia and Tanzania.

 

Congratulations to Mike Reid for acceptance in TUTOR-PHC

Congratulations to BRIC NS member Mike Reid, who has been accepted into the TUTOR-PHC program,  a one-year certificate program in primary health care research skills and interdisciplinary theory and processes.  BRIC NS provides financial support to one graduate student member for participation in the program.  You can read about his research below:

Mike Reid
Mike Reid

“There is a growing body of research in Nova Scotia highlighting high levels of community variation in health outcomes like unplanned repeat hospitalizations and long lengths of stay across the province. This research has also shown that this variation persists despite adjustment for a wide variety of factors (age, sex, disease, multimorbidity, etc.). These findings have led us to believe that there must be something about how the formal and informal support systems in specific communities interact with each other that is having a profound effect on the health outcomes of Nova Scotians. We refer to these interactions as “community systems of health”. My master’s work, along with a number of other studies have given us a good idea of where these variations in community systems of health are occurring. Through the TUTOR-PHC program as well as my doctoral work I will explore the question of how and why Nova Scotia’s community systems of health are resulting in different health outcomes across the province.”